The first 30 days of sarosuri.com

Today is 15 June, 2018, it’s the first 30 days of our new home for “Saro Suri”. Earlier this year, we set up “Saro Suri” on a website hosting service provider J×××o (we hiding the full name of those company). But in the morning of May 14, our site was suddenly “be off-line” without any notice, we send about 5 E-mails to the support team of those provider in 48 hours after off-line and want to know what happen, but till today there are still zero responds give back to us, nobody tell us what’s going on, perhaps we are just from the remote area of Africa… After the shocking wave of “be off-line”, we decided to rebuild our website on another place, then we chosen wordpress and got the domain name “sarosuri.com” for our new site. Today sarosuri.com is runing for 30 days, we hope our “erro” can successfully reached the next 30 days, 365 days and keep growing up.   NOTE: “erro”,  Suri word, mean “Children”

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[OPINION] “Adventure tourists, where’s your respect for remote tribes?” by Elliott Oakley

[REPOST] https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/may/21/adventure-tourists-remote-tribes-art-of-sharing-elliott-oakley A cash-free quest for ‘authentic’ culture ignores the needs of indigenous people, for whom no money may mean no healthcare or education Mon 21 May 2018 11.49 BST Last modified on Mon 11 Jun 2018 14.49 BST Every night during a 600-mile kayak trip, adventurer Pip Stewart asked her team members for their highlight of the day. In an Instagram post, she recounted how one, a Wai Wai guide named Romel, would give the same response each day: “It was good. I enjoyed the paddling. We had good food.” For the trip – which was the first ever descent of the Essequibo river in Guyana – Stewart and fellow adventurers Laura Bingham and Ness Knight recruited their guides from a village I know. As an anthropologist working with the Wai Wai, an indigenous people in the rainforest villages in Guyana and Brazil, I was struck by Stewart’s account. She observed that Romel and the Wai Wai “are better at accepting and appreciating what is”. Her post led me back to a question related to my own research: what do indigenous guides get out of adventure tourism? I lived with Wai Wai people for more than a year and participated in everyday village practices. I encountered a strikingly similar evaluation of conservation work. After days working as a guide for sport fishermen on nearby rivers, one Wai Wai friend complained these visitors from the US and Europe had not […]

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“Dongga” Stick fighting of Suri

A sport and ritual the Suri take extremely seriously is stick fighting. In most cases, stick fighting is done so young men can prove themselves to whole tribe. We invite you to real ethnographic adventure the country of the lost tribes. These tribes are still yet to be reached by the civilization and they are the last standing guards over the ancient customs and national traditions. The Saro_Suri to the distant and obscure lands of the Southern Ethiopia will introduce you to the hidden tribes of ,Suri Karo, Hamar, Ari, Dassenech, Nyangatom, Borena, Bena, Dorze, Arbore, Mursi and others and will allow you to shoot pictures that will remain forever in your memory. #omotribe #mursitribe #Sarosuri #team #education #tourguide #omoparks #magopark #wayoflife  

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Why we plan Education for Suri children?

Why “Saro Suri” plan Education for Suri children? We believe that at the heart of any education system are teachers and schools, and as we as “Saro Suri” we plan to work directly with them and operate within the school system. Our relationships with teachers and school administrators helps us to build support for the changes that need to take […]

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